Tag Archives: Historical

Explore Submarine Life in Sweden!

Parked Above the Sea

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If you’ve ever wondered what living in a World War II-era Swedish submarine was like, you can get a pretty good idea by visiting the Teknikens og Sjöfartens hus (The House of Maritime and Technology) in Malmö, Sweden. The museum is packed with historical objects related to high tech and the sea, including a vintage Swedish fighter jet. And don’t worry: the submarine—known as the U3—is in permanent dry dock, so hydrophobic travelers need not worry. Great for families as you walk through the belly of this stunning water machine.

Malmö is a cool city at the southern tip of Sweden. Although not a primary destination for most foreign visitors to Sweden, it’s worth the train ride from Stockholm or, as was our case, Copenhagen. It’s a quick ride across the Öresund Bridge from Denmark.

LINKS
The House of Technology and Maritime
More information about the U3 submarine
U3 Veterans Crew


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A Fighter Jet Emerges from the Trees

Flying by in Minnesota

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Special thanks to the City of Proctor, MN for their assistance with this article.

Cruising through northern Minnesota on our way home from our three-month inaugural road trip a while back, we noticed this vintage fighter jet quickly emerging from over the tree line as we drove along U.S. Highway 2. Except it wasn’t flying towards us. Actually, it wasn’t flying at all.

The jet—a (real) retired Cold War era F-101 Voodoo—is a memorial to Captain Sherman L. Gonyea and Captain James L. Verville of the Minnesota Air National Guard, who perished when their own F-101 was lost on December 17, 1971. This memorial also honors “All National Guardsmen who have given their lives that this great privilege will remain forever secure.”

This F-101 has a permanent home on the grounds of the city’s golf course, which is open to the public. A fitting tribute from the hometown of these men, the golf course also hosts a tournament each year in their honor. They will not be forgotten.

Parking
The nearby Community Center (100 Pionk Drive) has plenty of parking located at the bottom of the hill from the golf course, plus additional spots are at the nearby museum.

LINKS
Things to do in Proctor, MN
Proctor Golf Course


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More to Explore in Northern Manhattan. Meet The Cloisters.

Welcome to The Cloisters!

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Nestled into the woods of northern Manhattan’s Fort Tryon Park is a place that looks out of place for a city like New York. At first glance, The Cloisters—officially, The Met Cloisters, under the Metropolitan Museum of Art—could easily make you think you’ve arrived at an ancient Italian villa. But no, The Cloisters was built in modern times, borrowing heavily from medieval European influences.

Home to countless pieces of medieval art and artifacts, The Cloisters is a sight to be seen inside and out. Need a break from the museum? The gardens and views of the Hudson River are astounding on a nice sunny day.

We’ll save the pieces of art and artifacts for you to see for yourself–the stunning views at The Cloisters should be enough to entice you to visit. The pieces on display are centuries old.

You’d never think that this place is just a short subway ride away from Midtown.

LINKS
The Met Cloisters official website


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Bowling Lanes Turned Checkout Lanes At This Grocery Store

Bowling Shoes Not Required

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A special thank you to Erin and Jeff McNeil, owners of this Grocery Outlet location, for assisting UndiscoveredWanderings with this article. We thoroughly enjoyed our visit and are pleased to share our experience with our readership.

A few weeks ago, we did a piece on a retro-themed grocery store in Seattle’s Skyway suburb. Just when you finally wrapped your mind around the concept of a grocery store that’s also a tourist destination, we’ve got another one for you, except it didn’t start out as a store. It was once a bowling alley.

The same owners of the Skyway Grocery Outlet location actually started their first store here in Renton, WA–just outside of Seattle–in 2010 (the Skyway one in 2013). A bustling bowling alley for 40 years, when the McNeils moved in and turned it into a Grocery Outlet, they knew they had to keep the local heritage alive, so they built their store around the bowling alley. They even asked the demo crew to leave the old bowling lanes intact, which are now part of the checkout lanes.

As Erin explained to us, a number of local artists have done work here to keep Seattle’s heritage alive. Many of the old trophies and bowling memorabilia that dot the store’s landscape were donated by locals who had lots of memories and stories to tell.

There’s a lot of Seattle heritage here, for sure. “We try to promote local”, she told us. It’s a source of pride in the community. 

LINKS
Learn more about the owners
Visit the Skyway location


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The Final Resting Place of Ernest Hemingway

An American Icon At Peace

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Ernest Hemingway was, by all means, a talented writer–even if he was misunderstood at times. His extraordinary accomplishments and contributions to American literature are undeniable. But Hemingway was also a soldier, traveler, adventurer, and more. Despite his nonconformist life, he did have a dark side; his wild adventures and habits–including drinking–caught up with him in 1961, when he sadly took his own life. 

By then, he had moved to the secluded town of Ketchum in Idaho’s Sun Valley. And it is here where he is buried. The cemetery is down the road from the town’s main strip. It’s not hard to find his grave–it’s the one with books, pens, booze and money left by visitors and admirers (personally, we never condone defacing a grave). A reflection of his talents and struggles. He rests next to his wife, Mary Welsh Hemingway, who passed away a number of years after her husband.

Our visit was solemn, silent, and reflective.

Rest in peace, Mr. Hemingway.

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